How To Prepare For Furnace Duct Cleaning

How To Prepare For Furnace Duct Cleaning

Preparing for duct cleaning is one of the most important parts of having furnace duct cleaning. As such, it should not be skipped under any circumstan

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Preparing for duct cleaning is one of the most important parts of having furnace duct cleaning. As such, it should not be skipped under any circumstances. By preparing, you will ensure that your experience goes as smoothly as possible and that no damage is done to your home.

Following these five easy steps can help you prepare for duct cleaning:

1. Schedule duct cleaning during off-hours.

It’s never a good idea to schedule ductwork maintenance during times when people are normally using their ducts and furnaces—for example, from 5 pm on a winter Friday until Monday morning at 8 am isn’t a good time frame. This means turning your furnace off during those hours as well as closing registers and ducts in rooms where you won’t be present.

2. Close your exterior vents.

It’s a good idea to close off any exterior vents during duct cleaning—it prevents things like leaves and other debris from entering your duct system while the duct cleaners are hard at work inside. This step also helps prevent cold drafts from entering through your ducts when they’re turned off—which will help keep heat in the house if that’s what you want.

3. Turn off your furnace.

When you’ve got a whole-home ventilation system, it becomes even more important not to have the ducts on when a company is attempting to clean them. That’s because all of those dust particles being forced through ductwork are likely to fly all over your house, sending you and your family into coughing fits.

4. Close interior dampers.

If you have a duct system that brings fresh air into the house, then it makes sense to close any interior dampers during ductwork cleaning. This will help keep dust particles from flying freely throughout the house—they’ll be stuck inside the ducts until they’re clean.

5. Get canaries or use other warning systems.

You can use something as simple as a few cans of beans with small stones inside them or even hang bright ribbons above registers that may stir up dust when opened in order to determine if the leaning is complete. If the beans rattle around or the ribbons move, duct cleaners are still at work and should be told to stop so you don’t risk stirring up dust throughout your ducts.